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HARDWOOD PLYWOOD

Renneberg Hardwoods strives to provide its customers with the finest, most consistent quality plywood available on the market. For this reason, Renneberg Hardwoods has chosen an industry-leading producer for its hardwood panels. All hardwood panels are produced domestically from the finest hardwood veneer and cores available in the market. We can offer virtually unlimited options for faces, backs, finishes and cores. From Oak to exotic Anigre, we can delivers a world of options in hardwood panels.

HARDWOODS

 

Alder

The uniform texture of alder is easy to work and is easy to sand for an extra smooth finish. It's a popular choice for veneer, plywood, furniture and cabinetry.

Aromatic Cedar

The excellent resistance to both decay and insects make aromatic red cedar a great option for outdoor use without pretreating the wood. Common uses include fence posts, plywood, closet linings, carvings and outdoor furniture.

Cherry

The close grain of cherry creates a beautiful look. It's a great choice for plywood, veneer, furniture, cabinetry, carvings and musical instruments.  

Hickory

Hickory stains and finishes beautifully. It's most commonly used for flooring, plywood, tool handles, and ladder rungs. 

Knotty Pine

The decorative knots featured in knotty pine make it a common choice for interior finishing and furniture as well as plywood. It glues and finishes well and is generally a more budget friendly option. 

Mahogany

Mahogany is easy to work with and glues and finishes well. Its most common uses include veneer, plywood, turned items, furniture, boatbuilding and interior trim.

Natural Ash

Woodworkers like ash because it's easy to work with. Natural ash comes from both the hard center and soft outer edges of the trunk. It's most commonly used in flooring, millwork, boxes/crates and plywood.

Natural Birch

The "plywood" wood, natural birch has varying colors being it's made from the entire trunk of the tree. Birch is widely used for veneer and plywood as well as boxes, crates and interior trim and doors. 

Natural Maple

Natural Maple is rich in color being it's made from both the hard center and soft outer edges of the trunk. Maple works great for butcher block, cutting boards, work benches and veneer.

Natural Poplar

Pale in color, poplar is a utility wood that is a great, affordable option for things such as pallets, crates, and plywood. It's a softer wood that is easy to work with.

Red Birch

The "plywood" wood, red birch is red in color being it's made from only the dark red, hard center of the tree trunk. Birch is widely used for veneer and plywood as well as boxes, crates and interior trim and doors. 

Red Oak

This beautifully smelling wood is one of the most commonly used woods in the United States. It's easy to work with and abundantly available. It's most commonly used in cabinetry, floors, interior trim and furniture.

Walnut

Walnut is a durable wood that is easy to work with and stains well. It is most commonly used in furniture, cabinetry, veneer gun stocks and musical instruments. 

Western Red Cedar

Western red cedar has the color of its name, a reddish brown, that has a medium to coarse texture. It's most commonly used in exterior applications such as shingles, siding and lumber. 

White Ash

Woodworkers like ash because it's easy to work with. White ash is lighter in color because it from the soft outer edges of the trunk. It's most commonly used in flooring, millwork, boxes/crates and plywood.

White Birch

The "plywood" wood, white birch is lighter in color coming from the softer part of the trunk. Birch is widely used for veneer and plywood as well as boxes, crates and interior trim and doors. 

White Maple

Natural Maple is white in color being it's made from the soft outer edges of the trunk. Maple works great for butcher block, cutting boards, work benches and veneer.

White Oak

White oak is an extremely durable wood that is a light to medium brown color. It's as beautiful as it is strong and it's most commonly used in cabinetry, flooring, furniture, interior trim and veneers. 

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VENEER CUTTINGS

Rotary Cut

The log is centrally mounted on a computerized, hydraulic lathe and turned at a high speed against a special knife, which peels the veneer in a long continuous sheet, similar to unwinding a roll of paper.  A wide variegated grain pattern is often the result.  Rotary cut veneer is either left as a whole piece veneer, or is cut into narrower widths to be assembled later into a spliced veneer face.

Rift Cut

Rift sliced veneer is produced in much the same way as plain sliced veneer except that the log is cut into quarters lengthwise. The log is then sliced at a 90 degree angle to the grain. This produces narrow strips of veneer with a straight vertical grain. The narrow strips of veneer are assembled later to form the veneer face.

Plain Cut

The log is cut into half lengthwise.  The half log is then moved back and forth against a stationary knife, producing parallel slices through the center of the log. This produces narrow strips of veneer that closely match that of flat sawn lumber. The narrow strips of veneer are assembled later to form the veneer face.

Quarter Sliced

Quarter sliced veneer is produced in the same way as the rift cut. The log is cut into quarters length wise then sliced at a 90 degree angle to the grain. This produces narrow strips of veneer with a straight vertical grain. The narrow strips of veneer are assembled later to form the veneer face.

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VENEER MATCHING

 

Slip Match

Adjacent veneer sheets are joined side by side, same sides up, for a uniform grain pattern.

Whole Piece

One single piece of veneer is used, with continuous grain characteristics running across the sheet.

Pleasing Match

Veneers are matched by color or similarity, not necessarily by grain characteristics.

Book Match

Every other piece of adjacent veneer is turned over, resulting in identical, but opposing, patterns.

Random Match

Veneers intentionally do not match at the joints, providing a casual effect.

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PLYWOOD CORE

 

The inner core of plywood is what determines the performance and appearance of the entire sheet.  Strength varies based on the core so it is important to choose the right plywood core to match your project to ensure a successful outcome. 

V/C Veneer Core

This is the standard veneer cross-banding techniques where an odd number of veneers are laminated together to produce the final panel. The number of veneers in a panel is referred to as the number of plies. Most hardwood plywood contains from 3 plies in ¼” plywood to 11 plies or more in the thicker panels.

MDF Fibercore

This is where a medium density fiberboard is used as the core in the manufacture of the panel.  This is a 3-ply construction using a face veneer, a back veneer and the fiberboard as the core.  This type of construction tends to produce the most stable panel. Fibercore construction also offers a void free core with excellent machinability. The fibercore with its smooth surface provides a superior core for finishing the face and back veneer. The only real negative on fibercore construction is the weight of the panel produced.  A typical ¾” thick plywood with fibercore will weigh approx. 100 lbs.

CFC

This combines the MDF cross bands with softwood veneer innerplies. The MDF cross bands provide an ultra smooth surface to reduce telegraphing through the face, while the veneer innerplies maintain the strength and screw-holding power of a veneer core panel. This option is recommended for high end veneers.

PBC Particleboard

This is where an industrial grade particleboard is used as the core in the manufacture of the panel. The construction of the panel is the same as fibercore. Particleboard core has the same advantages and disadvantages of fibercore with the exception of not having the same degree of machinability.